Database Two: Aviation safety data

This post is part of a series on free data available to curious researchers and professionals:

The Aviation Safety Network Database

The ASN Safety Database, updated every week, contains descriptions of over 12,200 airliner, military transport category aircraft and corporate jet aircraft safety occurrences since 1943.

Here is a link to their recording of the recent landing on the Hudson river by a US Airways airbus.

Included in the report:

  1. a summary of the occurrence
  2. multiple photos of damage
  3. video from reports
  4. maps
  5. statistics

Statistics include:

19th loss of a Airbus A320

This is the 19th Airbus A320 plane that was damaged beyond repair as result of an accident, a criminal act or a non-operational occurrence (hangar fire, hurricanes etc.).

11th worst accident involving a Airbus A320 (at the time)
When the accident happened it was, at the time, the 11th worst accident involving a Airbus A320. This includes crashes as a result of criminal acts (shoot down, sabotage etc.) and does also include ground fatalities.

11th worst accident involving a Airbus A320 (currently)
Currently this is the 11th worst accident involving a Airbus A320. This includes crashes as a result of criminal acts (shoot down, sabotage etc.) and does also include ground fatalities.

1095th worst accident in United States of America (at the time)

When the accident happened it was, at the time, the 1095th worst accident in United States of America. This includes crashes as a result of criminal acts (shoot down, sabotage etc.) and does also include ground fatalities. Please note that accidents that have occurred more than 12 miles / 19,3 km offshore in open waters are classified under one of the three Oceans (Atlantic, Indian, Pacific).

1096th worst accident in United States of America (currently)
Currently this is the 1096th worst accident in United States of America. This includes crashes as a result of criminal acts (shoot down, sabotage etc.) and does also include ground fatalities.

Please note that accidents that have occurred more than 12 miles / 19,3 km offshore in open waters are classified under one of the three Oceans (Atlantic, Indian, Pacific).

When available, you can also find recordings and transcripts from the “black boxes” on airplanes. In all, a great database for many kinds of data.