ipad

Update on an Academic’s Use of the iPad

There seems to be a huge amount of interest in the use of iPads in academia as evidenced by the popularity of my last post on the iPad. This is just a follow-up post with some more app recommendations and more thoughts on how well it substitutes for my laptop after over a month of use.

View from Glacier Point
View of half dome from subdome (yes we went up)

I recently went on vacation for a few weeks (to Yosemite National Park) and carried the iPad exclusively.  I used the Camera Connection Kit to download and view pictures and movies from my digital camera.

When I could get wireless in the park, the built-in email client worked wonderfully with my campus Microsoft Exchange email/calendar system.  Touch-typing emails is a real pleasure once you get used to the software keyboard.

To temper my enthusiasm for the iPad, Anne will present her, “things I hate about the iPad” post shortly.  In the meantime, I just wanted to follow-up with some more app ideas for anyone in academia who is thinking of using an iPad.

First, I still use Evernote as my primary note-taking application when I need to jot down an idea, draft a blog post, draft a paper review, etc. But the major downside (which isn’t the fault of Evernote) is that the lack of true multi-tasking is really annoying. I’d love to be able to have a small note window on the bottom half of the screen to take notes while I do something else.   This is not yet a major annoyance and should be partially fixed when the iPad gets updated to iOS4 this fall.

I also still use iAnnotate a great deal to read PDFs. During my vacation, I used iAnnotate to store, read, and search PDFs of various things to do around Yosemite.  I also used it for light airport/airplane reading of some work material.  The instant-on capability (and 10+ hr battery life really came in handy on the cross-country air and road trip).  PDF tip: if you scan your own journal articles, make sure to OCR them so that they are searchable within any PDF app.

Recently, the iBooks app, from Apple, was updated to support PDF reading. It presents another option if all you want is a PDF reader. It displays your documents on a bookshelf:

I recently downloaded DocsToGo to create and edit Microsoft Office-compatible files and have since abandoned the iWork apps (including Keynote).  I recently created a presentation in Keynote but then only later realized that Keynote does not export to Office/PowerPoint for later editing on the desktop.  It does import PPT files. Apple’s reputation for a closed ecosystem rears its ugly head!

Another major limitation of Keynote is in its presentation capabilities.  When you pair the iPad with the iPad VGA connector (to connect to projectors) you might think you have a great, portable solution for presentations.  Almost.  The connector does output to a projector but you can’t see your presentation on the iPad itself.  All you get is slide up/down control and a laser pointer simulation.  Hopefully this will be remedied in a Keynote update.

The iWork apps (Pages, Keynote, and Numbers) are designed well and incredibly easy and intuitive to use but the lack of a proper export option precludes me from using them full time.

Here are some screen captures of DocsToGo:

A really cool feature of DocsToGo is that it will interface with your Google Docs account and let you edit (offline) any file you have in the Google cloud. This is especially useful if you or your campus uses Google Docs for collaborative activities.  Changes made offline on the iPad will be uploaded back into your cloud. It also integrates with DropBox (another must-have tool that is available on the iPad).

Mac-using academicians may be familiar with the Papers application which allows users build a personal database of PDF articles.   A stand-alone version is available for the iPad:

Although this application does not require the desktop copy of the Papers application, I think it might work best when it syncs with a library that exists on your desktop. The company does not make a PC version so I’ve found this app of limited use right now. It might be more useful next time I need to do a new literature review.

This blog runs on WordPress.  I know many other academics who run blogs also use WordPress because of its simplicity and ease of use.  The WordPress iPad app comes in handy to do light editing, content creation, and spam management on the go.

Wordpress for iPad

There are many things that the iPad cannot do. One of them is run PC software like SPSS (used for data analysis). When I need to access specialized applications for a short time, I use VNC viewer which lets me connect to and control my desktop computer (which is running RealVNC) from my iPad.  Controlling a desktop computer with only a touchscreen is executed very elegantly with the VNC viewer.

Finally, if you’re like me and don’t necessarily want to broadcast to the world that you are carrying around an iPad, what better hiding place than in a book!  I just received the DodoCase (after a 6 week wait).  Highly recommended:

iPad in Dodocase. Moleskine Pocket notebook on top

(image of TRS-80 Model 100 from Wikipedia)

7 thoughts on “Update on an Academic’s Use of the iPad”

  1. I should have bought a ipad – the kindle is almost useless for academics…I will hack mine to try and increase the functionality this coming holiday…if it bricks, then I have a good reason to buy the ipad!

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