Usability Potpourri

HF/Usability Potpourri returns with two recent items.

iPhone Reception Display

Reports from some sites suggest that at least some of the cellular reception issues of the new iPhone 4 are due to improper display of signal strength.  This is a neat HF issue because it involves user’s trust in automation (the display of reception bars is actually a computed value, not a raw meter of actual signal strength), the design of information displays, and properly informing the user so they can set expectations.  Apple is planning to tweak the way in which those bars get calculated (presumably to be less optimistic) to bring user expectations in-line with reality.

From an Apple press release:

Upon investigation, we were stunned to find that the formula we use to calculate how many bars of signal strength to display is totally wrong. Our formula, in many instances, mistakenly displays 2 more bars than it should for a given signal strength. For example, we sometimes display 4 bars when we should be displaying as few as 2 bars.

Mozilla Browser Visualization

Next, Mozilla, creators of Firefox, present some interesting visualizations of what users are clicking in Firefox.  As expected, the back button is one of the most frequently clicked items (93% of all users).

Interestingly, the RSS icon in the location bar (the orange square icon used to subscribe to blogs) showed some operating system differences.  Five percent of PC/Windows users clicked it, 11% of Mac users, and about 14% of Linux users.  Indicative of experiential differences?  PC users less aware of blogs/blog readers?

Our own analytics show that the vast majority of our readers visit from PC-based Firefox installations.  As a service to our readers, here is the subscribe link to our blog 🙂

2 thoughts on “Usability Potpourri”

  1. As a human factors geek and a software geek, my first thought on reading Apple’s press release is that they are simply going to reduce the user’s expectations by adding a line like “BarsToDisplay-=2;” just to stop people complaining.

    That is, I cynically suspect that their calculation really is correct as-is, but they figure people will complain less if fewer bars are displayed regardless of what the signal strength actually is.

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