Bad Usability Causes Cranky Babies

I peripherally heard about another Tylenol recall and assumed the recall was prompted by tainted medicine or something.  Anne just sent me a link to the story and it is apparently usability related.  The syringe-based dosing system, called SimpleMeasure, seems to be difficult to use.  Here is what NPR says:

the “SimpleMeasure” dosing system that’s supposed to make it easier to fill a syringe with the right amount of the grapey painkiller and fever-reducer is too complicated for some parents.

Looking down the barrel of a gun

Here is a design that requires disobedience of the fundamental rule in a sport: don’t point your gun at someone you don’t plan to shoot. Blogger Mark Shead posits it might be due to a lack of domain knowlege by the designer and extends the analogy to software design.

Mistakes in software design aren’t always as easy to spot, but often it comes down to the same thing. To design something you must have at least a basic level of domain knowledge.  That doesn’t means you have to be a world famous chef in order to write a recipe webapp, but you need to make sure you at least know the basics.

Read the full post discussing this design.

Development of the ground proximity warning system for aviation

This article tells the story of inspiration for and creation of a “ground proximity warning” system for pilots, as well as multiple other types of cockpit warnings. Don’t miss the video embedded as a picture in the article! It has the best details!

Some choice excerpts:

About 3.5 miles out from the snow-covered rock face, a red light flashed on the instrument panel and a recorded voice squawked loudly from a speaker.

“Caution — Terrain. Caution — Terrain.”

The pilot ignored it. Just a minute away from hitting the peaks, he held a steady course.

Ten seconds later, the system erupted again, repeating the warning in a more urgent voice.

The pilot still flew on. Snow and rock loomed straight ahead.

Suddenly the loud command became insistent.

“Terrain. Pull up! Pull up! Pull up! Pull up! Pull up!”

Accidents involving controlled flight into terrain still happen, particularly in smaller turboprop aircraft. During the past five years, there have been 50 such accidents, according to Flight Safety Foundation data.

But since the 1990s, the foundation has logged just two in aircraft equipped with Bateman’s enhanced system — one in a British Aerospace BAe-146 cargo plane in Indonesia in 2009; one in an Airbus A321 passenger jet in Pakistan in 2010.

In both cases, the cockpit voice recorder showed the system gave the pilots more than 30 seconds of repeated warnings of the impending collisions, but for some reason the pilots ignored them until too late.

After a Turkish Airlines 737 crashed into the ground heading into Amsterdam in 2009, investigators discovered the pilots were unaware until too late that their air speed was dangerously low on approach. Honeywell added a “low-airspeed” warning to its system, now basic on new 737s.

For the past decade, Bateman has worked on ways of avoiding runway accidents by compiling precise location data on virtually every runway in the world.

New automation will warn drivers of lane changes

Ford is introducing a system that first warns of a lane change, then actually changes the direction of the car if the warning is ignored. From the USA Today article:

When the system detects the car is approaching the edge of the lane without a turn signal activated, the lane marker in the icon turns yellow and the steering wheel vibrates to simulate driving over rumble strips. If the driver doesn’t respond and continues to drift, the lane icon turns red and EPAS will nudge the steering and the vehicle back toward the center of the lane. If the car continues to drift, the vibration is added again along with the nudge. The driver can overcome assistance and vibration at any time by turning the steering wheel, accelerating or braking.

Is this going to be as annoying as having Rich Pak’s phone beep every time I go over the speed limit (which is A LOT)? Just kidding – stopping a drifting car could be pretty great.

 

LOLcat photo credit to ClintCJL at Flickr.

Fun with confusing medication names!

Check out this post from The Consumerist about how unhappy the FDA is with Durezol and Durasal.

A hint: It’s ok if you accidentally use Durezol when you wanted Durasal, but the penalty is high for using Durasal instead of Durezol!*

This link contains an explanation of the names:

When drugs are submitted to the FDA for approval, the Agency carefully screens their proprietary names for similarities. However, Durasal (salicylic acid) is an OTC medication that did not undergo the approval process. That is why the two names exist side-by-side in the pharmacies.

Thus far, the FDA is asking pharmacists to “be vigilant.” I think we know how that usually plays out.

 

*Durezol is eye drops. Durasal is wart remover.