Prescription Smartphone Apps

I recently published a study (conducted last year) on automation trust and dependence. In that study, we pseudo-wizard-of-oz’ed a smartphone app that would help diabetics manage their condition.

We had to fake it because there was no such app and it would be to onerous to program it (and we weren’t necessarily interested in the app, just a form of advanced, non-existent automation).

Now, that app is real.  I had nothing to do with it but there are now apps that can help diabetics manage their condition.  This NYT article discusses the complex area of healthcare apps:

Smartphone apps already fill the roles of television remotes, bike speedometers and flashlights. Soon they may also act as medical devices, helping patients monitor their heart rate or manage their diabetes, and be paid for by insurance.

The idea of medically prescribed apps excites some people in the health care industry, who see them as a starting point for even more sophisticated applications that might otherwise never be built. But first, a range of issues — around vetting, paying for and monitoring the proper use of such apps — needs to be worked out.

The focus of the article is on regulatory hurdles while our focus (in the paper) was how potential patients might accept and react to advice given by a smartphone app.

(photo: Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times)