Product Confusability: Tide Pods

Kim Wolfinbarger sends along a new case of dangerous things being confused for food (the story is the same but the actors different, see previous examples).  Before you reflexively say, “only an idiot would confuse the two,” remember that 5-year olds don’t know the difference.  First rule of HF-club: you are not the user (or victim):

In California alone, 307 cases of accidentally ingestion of laundry packs by young children have been reported this year. And the cases in California, and nationwide, aren’t just limited to toddlers snarfing Tide Pods. When the product was released, Tide rivals such as All and Purex launched their own single-dose detergent capsules as well. Earlier this summer, Tide reconfigured the packaging of the product, adding a double-latched lid to the plastic tubs containing the Pods to make it more difficult for children to tamper with. Still, the number of reported incidents continues to climb along with news stories warning parents to take caution.

Just yesterday, Consumer Reports reported on a wave of Tide Pod-related poisonings in Glasgow, Scotland while the New York Daily News published a quick article stating that in New York City alone, 40 children have been hospitalized after eating the packs since April. TODAY also just published a piece on the alarming trend in which Ken Wahl, medical director for the Illinois Poison Center states: “I’ve never seen a consumer product that had that degree of injury in a child.”
Dishwashing detergent also comes in pod-like single serving doses but I am not aware of similar cases of ingestion.  Maybe it’s the coloring (they tend to be blue/green) or size (they are a bit larger I think)?

2 thoughts on “Product Confusability: Tide Pods”

  1. Wow – the diagram on the right looks like a candy jar -with a bright orange & purple wrapper. Probably quite inviting for a child.

    But the point about why this doesn’t seem to happen as much for dishwasher detergent was a very good one. Besides the packaging, the context (storage place) may also introduce confusion. I bet few parents keep anything food-like under the sink where dishwasher detergent is stored, but the laundry pods may be stored in more generic locations… perhaps even a regular pantry or in the laundry room where they are “hidden” (or maybe this was just my mom who did this)

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