Designing the technology of ‘Blade Runner 2049’

The original Bladerunner is my favorite movie and can be credited as sparking my interest in human-technology/human-autonomy interactions.  The sequel is fantastic if you have not seen it (I’ve seen it twice already and soon a third).

If you’ve seen the original or sequel, the representations of incidental technologies may have seemed unusual.  For example, the technologies feel like a strange hybrid of digital/analog systems, they are mostly voice controlled, and the hardware and software has a well-worn look.  Machines also make satisfying noises as they are working (also present in the sequel).  This is a refreshing contrast to the super clean, touch-based, transparent augmented reality displays shown in other movies.

This really great post/article from Engadget [WARNING CONTAINS SPOILERS] profiles the company that designed the technology shown in the movie Bladerunner 2049.  I’ve always been fascinated by futuristic UI concepts shown in movies.  What is the interaction like?  Information density? Multi-modal?  Why does it work like that and does it fit in-world?

The article suggests that the team really thought deeply about how to portray technology and UI by thinking about the fundamentals (I would love to have this job):

Blade Runner 2049 was challenging because it required Territory to think about complete systems. They were envisioning not only screens, but the machines and parts that would made them work.

With this in mind, the team considered a range of alternate display technologies. They included e-ink screens, which use tiny microcapsules filled with positive and negatively charged particles, and microfiche sheets, an old analog format used by libraries and other archival institutions to preserve old paper documents.